Ҵý

Bias or Hate Reporting

St. Ҵý is committed to providing an inclusive living, learning, and working environment that supports the well-being of each member and respects the dignity of each person. Incidents of hate and bias are inconsistent with the St. Ҵý mission and convictions and have no place here.

Anyone can make a report – the target of a bias incident, a friend, or a witness. If you believe that you or someone else has been adversely affected by a bias incident, make a report. If you are a student who has experienced or witnessed a bias or hate incident, we want to address the incident and provide you with resources.

The primary purpose of the reporting system is to connect the reporter or target of a bias incident with support and resources. In addition, St. Ҵý will use data from the reporting system to track incidents of bias and to initiate investigations of potential policy violations.

The Bias Incident Toolkit is designed to help St. Ҵý respond promptly and effectively to reported behavior that does not align with our Ҵý's mission and values.

Bias Incidents vs. Hate Crimes

Incidents of hate and bias have no place here. If you have experienced or witnessed an incident, we want to address the situation and provide you with resources.

  • Bias Incidents
  • Protected Characteristics
  • Hate Crimes
  • Examples
  • Bias Incidents

    A bias incident is unwelcome conduct that has a negative impact on an individual or group and that one could reasonably conclude is based on an actual or perceived protected characteristic, regardless of whether the conduct is unlawful or violates policy.

    Bias incidents vary in degree and some rise to the level of hate crime, harassment, or other policy violation. Other bias incidents do not rise to that level but still have adverse effects on our Ҵý members.

    Protected Characteristics

    A protected characteristic means race, color, creed, religion, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, familial status, disability, age, marital status, status with regard to public assistance, veteran status, membership or activity in a local commission, genetic information, or any other characteristic protected by applicable law.

    Hate Crimes

    A hate crime is a severe form of a bias incident. A hate crime is criminal conduct against a person or property motivated in whole or part by bias based on the protected characteristic of an individual or group. Hate crimes violate St. Ҵý policy and the law.

    Students are strongly encouraged to call Public Safety or law enforcement immediately if they become aware of a possible hate crime, to ensure an immediate response. St. Ҵý may address alleged criminal conduct, including hate crimes, and may report such conduct to law enforcement.

    Examples

    Bias incidents include, but are not limited to, any of the following: using epithets, slurs or offensive jokes based on a protected characteristic; displaying or circulating written materials, objects, videos, audio or pictures that degrade an individual or group based on a protected characteristic; verbal abuse or insults about people in a protected group or directed at an individual because of a protected characteristic; imitating the speech, walk or movement of a person with a disability with the intent to mock or embarrass them; damaging property or engaging in physical violence motivated in any way by a protected characteristic."

    Don’t worry if you are not sure whether the incident meets these definitions. St. Ҵý will consider the facts and circumstances to determine an appropriate response and can offer support resources regardless.

    Bias Incidents

    Bias Incidents

    A bias incident is unwelcome conduct that has a negative impact on an individual or group and that one could reasonably conclude is based on an actual or perceived protected characteristic, regardless of whether the conduct is unlawful or violates policy.

    Bias incidents vary in degree and some rise to the level of hate crime, harassment, or other policy violation. Other bias incidents do not rise to that level but still have adverse effects on our Ҵý members.

    Protected Characteristics

    Protected Characteristics

    A protected characteristic means race, color, creed, religion, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, familial status, disability, age, marital status, status with regard to public assistance, veteran status, membership or activity in a local commission, genetic information, or any other characteristic protected by applicable law.

    Hate Crimes

    Hate Crimes

    A hate crime is a severe form of a bias incident. A hate crime is criminal conduct against a person or property motivated in whole or part by bias based on the protected characteristic of an individual or group. Hate crimes violate St. Ҵý policy and the law.

    Students are strongly encouraged to call Public Safety or law enforcement immediately if they become aware of a possible hate crime, to ensure an immediate response. St. Ҵý may address alleged criminal conduct, including hate crimes, and may report such conduct to law enforcement.

    Examples

    Examples

    Bias incidents include, but are not limited to, any of the following: using epithets, slurs or offensive jokes based on a protected characteristic; displaying or circulating written materials, objects, videos, audio or pictures that degrade an individual or group based on a protected characteristic; verbal abuse or insults about people in a protected group or directed at an individual because of a protected characteristic; imitating the speech, walk or movement of a person with a disability with the intent to mock or embarrass them; damaging property or engaging in physical violence motivated in any way by a protected characteristic."

    Don’t worry if you are not sure whether the incident meets these definitions. St. Ҵý will consider the facts and circumstances to determine an appropriate response and can offer support resources regardless.

    Bias Contacts

    Dean of Students

    St. Paul Campus
    Anderson Student Center, Room 241
    deanstudents@stthomas.edu
    (651) 962-6050

    Office Hours
    Mon-Fri: 8:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    Closed Holidays

    Human Resources

    St. Paul Campus
    Aquinas Hall, Room 217
    humanresources@stthomas.edu
    (651) 962-6510

    Office Hours
    Mon–Fri: 8:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    Closed Holidays

    Public Safety

    St. Paul Campus
    Morrison Hall, 1st Floor

    Minneapolis Campus
    School of Law, 1st Floor
    Non-emergency: (651) 962-5100
    Emergency: (651) 962-5555